Australia relationships improve • Are you thinking Australia? | thinkingaustralia |
Local:
Sydney: Sat 7:42PM
Select Destination
Location Time Temp
Sydney7:42PM Sat14°
Melbourne7:42PM Sat11°
Brisbane7:42PM Sat20°
Perth5:42PM Sat16°
Adelaide7:12PM Sat
Hobart7:42PM Sat
Canberra7:42PM Sat
Darwin7:12PM Sat30°

news

Get our help FREE advice or find service providers with our ozdirectory

Australia relationships improve

12 July 2020 by News Desk

Australia family relationships have improved during the pandemic a new study has found.

Parents living with a child had seen the biggest improvement, the study found.

An Australian National University study of 3200 people found that more than a quarter felt their relationships had improved. Researchers say respondents were referring to their closest relationships, including partners and children.

Parents living with a child have seen the biggest improvement in their relationships, with 32.7 per cent saying they have been positively impacted, versus about a quarter of non-parents feeling the same.

Meanwhile, less than a fifth of both parents and non-parents felt relationships had worsened.

Of those with a partner, just under a third said their relationships had improved.

And a higher proportion of women (30.8 per cent) than men (24.9 per cent) saw beneficial changes to their relationships.

Lead researcher Professor Nicholas Biddle said it was particularly interesting to see such high levels of improvement among parents, who had been navigating enormous changes to work, school and childcare arrangements.

“We know there have been challenges… but that doesn’t appear to have had a large negative effect for people who have kids in the household,” Professor Biddle said.

“For whatever negatives there have been in terms of additional load, and let’s be honest the load has fallen particularly on females, at least there has been that side benefit of relationship improvement.

“Just because things are a struggle doesn’t mean it doesn’t lead to relationship improvements.”

Professor Biddle said non-parents may have seen less change because their home life was not as impacted by lockdown measures. He said more time spent together and increased support from partners may have played a positive role in some families.

Are you thinking about living and working in Australia? Contact us today – send us your CV, fill out our ‘helpline’ form and we will provide an express eligibility assessment free of charge.

https://www.thinkingaustralia.com/migration/eligibility-enquiry

Check out our news page for daily updates https://www.thinkingaustralia.com/news

For a range of official government information about Australia, visit https://www.Australia.gov.au



We use cookies on Thinking Australia

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Please confirm permission to use cookies. Cookie Policy Privacy policy