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Moving to Australia: Hobart bans plastic containers

29 November 2016 by News Desk

Moving to Australia, a country that is taking bold steps towards a new ‘green’ environment.

Moving to AustraliaMoving to Australia: the city council in Hobart has launched a plan to phase-out and ban traditional takeaway containers.

The ban would bring to an end the use of single-use plastic containers at restaurants, takeaways and delicatessens.

In future retailers will only be able to provide containers made of compostable or recycled materials that break down in the environment.

Hobart City Council has voted unanimously in favour of the phase-out that aims to reduce the impact of plastic on human health, biodiversity and ocean ecology.

Moving to Australia: Hobart bans plastic containers

The council has ordered a report to set out how to implement the plastics ban by changes to the city’s Health and Environmental Services Bylaw.

The report will include a timeline for implementation of appropriate measures by 2020 and look at how Hobart can collaborate with the State Government for maximum effect.

Hobart is the first city in Australia to seek such a ban on plastic containers.
France will be the first country in the world to ban plastic cups, plates and cutlery when new national laws come into effect in 2020.

Where single-use containers are unavoidable, compostable containers should be used, which means they will completely decompose.

Environmental campaigners have welcomed the move, which they say is already voluntarily gaining momentum among many retailers throughout Hobart.

Plastic cannot biodegrade. It breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces. Disposed plastic materials can remain in the environment for up to 2000 years and longer.

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